Vietnam Time

9/25/2018 10:33:43 PM

Three inspiring books for ambitious entrepreneurs

If you’re looking for some inspiration to become a successful entrepreneur, the following three books are highly recommended.

Think Like a Champion 

According to Tara Golshan (the Vox media)Donald Trump is a champion, according to Donald Trump, and Think Like a Champion — 50 essays in 188 pages of self-help book — is his guide to how you can be a champion too.

Fittingly, the series of essays begins with an example of a champion, someone to aspire to become at the end of the next 49 essays of advice. Published in 2009, Champion predates Trump’s predilections for presidential campaigns and the Republican Party. His champion of choice is President Barack Obama, and Trump has nothing but kind words for the then-newly elected leader of the free world.

Think Like a Champion — 50 essays in 188 pages of self-help book — is his guide to how you can be a champion

Obama has the "mark of a strong leader," Trump writes. He comprehensively understands the economy and surrounds himself with competent people; "the world is excited" about Obama:

What he has done is amazing. The fact that he accomplished what he has – in one year and against great offs – is truly phenomenal. If someone had asked me if a black man or woman could become president, I would have said yes, but not yet. Barack Obama proved that determination combined with opportunity and intelligence can make things happen – and in an exceptional way.

While Trump’s current political rhetoric is now essentially the opposite of this kind of praise, the book offers a certain insight into how the businessman operates. The stories both shed light on why Trump is Trump, while simultaneously presenting a series of egregious contradictions to his current platform.

Trump’s "thinking" is essentially a series of overarching and often contradictory platitudes: Be a self-starter; be informed; there is "no excuse for having a blind spot"; think big, but be pragmatic.

The advice has strong parallels with his campaign strategy, emphasizing the importance of capitalizing on success, having an ego, being surrounded by loyal and competent people, winning deals, working hard and reaping the benefits. Foreshadowing of the Trump campaign and presidency is present in every piece of wisdom; his boastful and bombastic "me, me, me" characteristics are evident in all of the advice.

Except when they’re not.

After all, had Trump listened to his own formula for success he might not currently be saddled with a massive blind spot when it comes to actually being informed on what it takes to do the job of president of the United States.

Competing with Giants: How One Family-Owned Company Took on the Multinationals and Won

Second generation Asian businesswoman, Phuong Uyen Tran, Deputy CEO of THP Group, today announced the publication of Competing with Giants: How One Family-Owned Company Took on the Multinationals and Won. The book is published with ForbesBooks, the exclusive business book publishing imprint of Forbes Media.

Two billion, five hundred million dollars. That is the amount of money Phuong Tran’s father, business mogul Dr. Tran Quy Thanh, walked away from in 2012 when Coca-Cola offered to acquire a controlling interest in their family business, Vietnamese THP Beverage Group. Watching her father turn down a sum of money most could never dream to see was an event that shaped Trần’s entire business philosophy from that day forward.

In her captivating book, Competing with Giants, Trần weaves business advice from her father with her own insights into a rich tapestry that tells the story of not only one company, but the quickly changing global business landscape.

Companies like Tran’s are rewriting the global business rules that Western multinationals have been operating on for decades. In her captivating book, Competing with Giants, Phuong weaves business advice from her father with her own insights into a rich tapestry that tells the story of not only one company, but the quickly changing global business landscape.

“The world the next generation inherits will be more connected and more multinational than any time in human history. There is only one thing we can all be sure of, and that’s the world will be what we collectively make it,” said Phuong.

Phuong’s message is an empowering one. As we move into an increasingly globalized world, businesses in the East and West will learn from one another other. And when small companies marry their local knowledge and with international business ideas, they can hold their own and even outflank giant global corporations.

Phuong’s wise and conversational tone in Competing with Giants, is that of a trusted mentor, someone a few steps ahead on the path. Her story asks readers to dream bigger and understand what is necessary to actualize those dreams. Throughout the book, Phuong reminds us of the adages of her father, specifically that, “nothing is impossible.”

Losing my virginity

The unusual, frequently outrageous autobiography of one of the great business geniuses in modern time, Richard Branson.

In little more than twenty-five years, Richard Branson spawned nearly a hundred successful ventures. From the airline business (Virgin Atlantic Airways), to music (Virgin Records and V2), to cola (Virgin Cola), and others ranging from financial services to bridal wear, Branson has a track record second to none. Many of his companies were started in the face of entrenched competition. The experts said, “Don’t do it.” But Branson found golden opportunities in markets in which customers have been ripped off or underserved, where confusion reigns, and the competition is complacent. 

Family, friends, fun, and adventure are equally important as business in Richard Branson's life.

In this stressed-out, overworked age, Richard Branson gives us a new model: a dynamic, hardworking, successful entrepreneur who lives life to the fullest. Branson has written his own “rules” for success, creating a group of companies with a global presence, but no central headquarters, no management hierarchy, and minimal bureaucracy. Family, friends, fun, and adventure are equally important as business in his life. Losing My Virginity is a portrait of a productive, sane, balanced life, filled with rich and colorful stories, including: Crash-landing his hot-air balloon in the Algerian desert, yet remaining determined to have another go at being the first to circle the globe; swimming two miles to safety during a violent storm off the coast of Mexico; staging a rescue flight into Baghdad before the start of the Gulf War.

And much more. Losing My Virginity is the ultimate tale of personal and business survival from a man who combines the business prowess of Bill Gates and the promotional instincts of P. T. Barnum./.

  ( VNF )
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